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Green construction

An energy-autonomous, CO2-neutral customer experience and training center is being built in Canada

The Endress+Hauser Group is investing 19 million euros in a completely sustainable building. The future customer experience and process training center in Burlington in the province of Ontario is designed to operate on a climate-neutral basis and cover all of its energy needs with local regenerative sources.

Endress+Hauser Canada ©Endress+Hauser

High claims: The new building in Canada is designed to be carbon-neutral.

“Our goal is to create an exceptional facility that will not only be sustainable on the day it opens, but will still be considered as such decades from now,” explains Anthony Varga, Managing Director, Endress+Hauser Canada. Double-sided solar panels on the roof of the two-story facility generate electricity, while a geothermal system supplies heat from underground. The triple-glazed facade prevents heat loss. The building is furthermore not connected to the local water supply network.

Tree-adorned atrium

The two-story customer experience and process training center is due to open in the spring of 2021. Among other things, customers can use a training center in the facility to familiarize themselves with Endress+Hauser process technology. “All of our customers and partners can simulate process conditions like the ones they have at their own plants,” says Anthony Varga. At the heart of the building will be an atrium featuring a live tree.

Ecological new construction

Endress+Hauser’s production is not energy intensive and has little impact on the environment. One of the biggest contributors to the ecological footprint is the building infrastructure. With this in mind, the Group designs new buildings with green aspects and meets demanding energy efficiency standards. For the building in Burlington, Endress+Hauser is striving to achieve gold status for the Canada Green Building Council LEED certification (leadership in energy and environmental design).